oh dear an injured deer and other not so random thoughts of an Animal Communicator

Last night on my way to the grocery store after three miles of dirt roads to get to town, I saw a little deer on the side of the road – it wanted me to spot him/her.  He was injured.  On a horse, the spot would be the stifle – and therefore the hoof wasn’t working yet there was a great amount of bend on the stifle itself.  I stopped.  This was not a frightened deer.

While I couldn’t say if I had sat there for very long that the deer would have eaten out of my hand, I will say – this deer wasn’t intimidated by me.  It wanted me to see him.  I heard gun shots all day I couldn’t help but to think that it was a gunshot wound and of course I made up that it lost its mother to a hunter.

The wound wasn’t fresh, it wasn’t even oozing.   Swollen, yes.  And this little deer was definitely negotiating the hind leg like it had figured this out.  I stopped; felt awful made a few phone calls and carried on with my grocery store mission.

When I came home, I called Paws.org only to discover that they won’t be open until the a.m. I contacted other groups and learned a lot.

I thought to myself, I have an empty stall, I could rehab.  However, this deer is two miles away.  How would I get this adolescent deer into a horse trailer if I could talk a friend into helping me?

I kept calling, only to discover lots about deer.  I really thought about the deer video I posted a week and a half ago – a deer as a pet. I thought heck – I’m already octomom of horses, dogs, cats, what a deer is going to break me? Not.

The truth is my better instinct kicked in.  I watched the deer, he had little safe spots.  Someone (can’t remember whether it was Sarvey Wildlife Center or the Second Chance Wildlife Care Center in Arlington, or possibly even another  group) thought that because I got out of the car and so close to the deer, perhaps it already had been fed by humans.

I also thought to myself at some point, live and let live – definitely do not chase – 6:00 pm Sunday night in Carnation is not high traffic, yet, I would hate to be trying to do something and drive the deer into traffic. 

No matter how painful it is, nature has a way of correcting itself.  As sweet as this deer was, the doe eyes – yet youthful, those crazy radar ears, the sweetness of the being, this deer has its own trajectory, contract, outcome that I have nothing to do with.  Today I made an impact the size of one breath saying I’d love to help you and I could feel it acknowledge my intent by not running off.

However, and this is why I write this, I learned tonight by wildlife experts there is actually a disease – I believe called White Muscle disease that occurs for injured deer. You see a deer that has no experience with humans that is beyond the spotted stage (this deer was beyond the spotted stage – probably between 4-7 months) will not imprint to humans for help.

So baby still with spots orphan deer can do well in our environment and be fine to return to the wild after a few bottles.  Any other deer can go into fight or flight and never come out of that state.  They will fight and fight – even if I had a horse trailer with me – I would have sparked perhaps the onset of a disease.   Once they are no longer in this fight state – it still triggers this disease.  This bizarre disease or condition is called:  ‘white muscle’ (or something like that) disease and it makes the muscles break down and eat themselves from staying in flight mode for too long.

As long as it is exposed to the condition that created the flight or fight status, it will not come out of that state.

I’m glad my instinct had me observe from a far this particular deer’s activity as I watched it go into a pasture through the opening in a fence.  This was not new, it was familiar.  I know where this deer is even now, not far from what it obviously perceives as a safe spot.

My guess is based on horse knowledge is that something in the hoof is not working based on the puncture (bullet) wound to the stifle area. The woman on the phone at Sarvey said we can only hope that area is a safe spot for that deer and that it will heal itself. A tendon or ligament injury like that takes time and we’ll see how kind this winter is.

I will say this about that deer, it is very smart and intuitive. It hid for other cars, but not for me.  It found an exact spot in a barbed wire fence to fit through.  It was eating leaves and grass under the frost every time I got close. And it was not skinny.

We just lost our Animal Control here due to lack of funding – so calling them was not an option.  If the deer were in worse shape – Game and Wildlife would have been the right call.  Because the wound wasn’t fresh, this deer has figured something out –

I had to look up in Ted Andrews Animal Speak – Deer: Gentleness and Innocence – Gentle Luring to New Adventure.

The wound wasn’t brand new and it wasn’t terribly old.  Let’s see that wound heal, the hoof work and that deer carry on.  And by reading this – you’ve been exposed to your own possible gentle admission of your new adventure……….what will that be in this New Year?

Blessings, Joan

www.joanranquet.com

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Great video on a dog helping Iraq vet with PTSD – Animal News and other random thoughts of an Animal Communicator

Video – Breaking News Videos from CNN.com.

Amazing job opportunities for rescue dogs – helping Iraq vets with PTSD. If the shelters are overrun – doesn’t it make sense to take these lovely dogs and give them great jobs? We have people coming home every day with PTSD – let’s put those dogs to work!

Right now shelters are at an all time high with occupancy and adoption and donation rate low…….let’s start funneling the donated  money to profile and then train the dogs that fit the bill for this type of work.  

That’s my 2 cents worth for the day…..blessings, Joan

www.joanranquet.com

Scottish terrier Sadie wins AKC national dog show – Pet Tales : The Orange County Register

Scottish terrier Sadie wins AKC national dog show – Pet Tales : The Orange County Register.

Look at that Sadie – so serious about her job and yet secretly, those Scotties can be so impish.  (Okay not so secretly if you’ve had a Scottie.)  I grew up with a Scottie. I love Scottie’s.  Her name was Penny – she was my very first dog – we picked her out of the litter at Thanksgiving from my cousins when I was seven and I slept in the back of the car with her all the way home from Spokane to Bellevue Wa (about 5 hours). We had another dog – Rini an elderly Manchester Terrier – Penyy wasn’t a big hit with Rini but she was my dog nonetheless.

I will always have a thing for Scotties. My cousin John (the same cousins) has a great Scottie named Sherman. Oh he gives my Olivia and Isabella a run for their money. He’ll pretend to play the game of letting them think it’s their house – but if there’s a ball – he’s going after it and may the best dog win.

Love the name Sadie – obviously the best dog won!!

p.s. remember that Saturday Night Live sketch – the famous quote – “if it isn’t Scottish – it’s crrrrrrraaaaaaap!”

p.p.s. I have blogged below about my new Cat Francesca potentially being the reincarnated Alexandria – my old cat – well I’ve often wondered if Olivia my 1/2 Border Collie is a reincarnation of Penny.  Oh more random thoughts of an Animal Communicator…..another post on pet reincarnation is clearly in the future says the pet psychic!!

www.joanranquet.com.

Just a deer story dear and other random thoughts of an Animal Communicator

PET DETECTIVE BLOG and other random thoughts of an Animal Communicator

PET DETECTIVE BLOG.

I have been on the subject of Kat Albrecht and her pet detective work – here’s a day in the life on her blog – an amazing story of a lost dog becoming a found dog!! Check it out. (She was just on my teleseminar this last week.)

Always for more info on great teleseminars and other amazing things to learn about in the Animal Kingdom – www.joanranquet.com.

Missing pet partnership, Kat Albrecht, Lost animals and other not so random thoughts of an Animal Communicator

Lost animals are truly the hardest piece of being an Animal Communicator. Many people think that they want to become an Animal Communicator because they wanted to go to vet school but they couldn’t handle the tragedies or the sick animals. Well, there are no shortage of tragedies as an animal communicator, the biggest one being – lost animals. Partly because there is no closure.

I discovered a missing piece to a puzzle tonight. I know working to help people find lost animals is so important. I know that sometimes people get closure – even if it means finding the body of their beloved. That  is better than the unknown, the forever haunting “what if I had only braved the cold…..crawled under the house….bothered my neighbors a little more……”

Monday night in my Animal Education Teleseminar – my guest was Kat Albrecht, a true Pet Detective and founder of http://www.missingpetpartnership.org and she was so inspiring. She was inspiring for many reasons which I will cheerfully divulge.

However, the missing puzzle piece tonight after 14 years of lost animal work from the psychic world is this…..for those that get debilitated emotionally, or can’t for some reason put some effort into finding your animal when they are lost – you must get out there and look. So many people give up right away thinking a coyote or a car got them. That is less the case than not. Then these animals become part of the feral community and/or the overrun shelters…..and adoption is at an all time low. I always do my homework before a call – but that was a delayed unexpected deep seated raison d’être for continuing lost animal work.

I’m working my tail off to help people keep forever homes through consultations, speaking and my book . . . so even for me tonight there was a major lightbulb. Really encourage at all costs people to get out and look – no matter what defeated excuses they give. And as I have ALWAYS said to clients, Kat confirmed – it’s a time to knock on your neighbors doors and ask if you can look in their yard.

************I lost my beloved Alexandria two years ago (after 13 years), so this was an especially important call.  Alexandria was very much my personal emotional raison d’être. She and I had been together in LA, Seattle, Denver, Florida and back to Seattle. She could move and bounce like the best of them. She had been on 3 farms, 2 urban setting, one suburban setting a beach townhouse and beachhouse, ski condo’s guest homes and hotels…… she was always THERE. Her disappearance is a story for another blog – this should focus on Kat and her amazing detective work.

Kat’s site http://www.missingpetpartnership.org has an amazing amount of tips for lost animals. And I might add this is Kat’s raison d’être. Her passion and skill came into play as she was a forensics detective that used dogs and one of her dogs was lost. Her dog was not only her lifeline to her detective work, but also her baby. She used her retired detective dog to find the newer dog and the idea sparked for missing pets.

Most of my students in Communication with all Life University are coming to the animal communication certification program later in life, as a second career. Kat’s awesome passion, her pursuit, her doubt, and her determination is an inspiration to all. Almost everyone was inspired by her amazing perseverance and others of course are drawn to the detective aspect.

There are always amazing calls on my Animal Education Teleseminar series – the continuing education part of Communication with all Life University – but this one hit a chord for all for many different “raison’s”.
Blessings, Joan

p.s. Eldon Taylor  next week – so much more 2010!!!!

http://www.joanranquet.com

ThanksgivingContest09 and other random thoughts of an Animal Communicator

So this was just put together for the ThanksgivingContest09. Always a good thing to take stock of what gives you joy!! I would also add family and friends.

www.joanranquet.com